Dental school is one of those formative experiences that can define a career … if we let it. Read on to see how Dr. John Nosti’s skill set has evolved over the ensuing years post-graduation.

Get the scoop on Dr. Nosti's dental school memories.This light-hearted Q & A with Dr. Nosti delves into the lessons that have lasted with him since donning his cap and gown. He explains the strengths he recognized, how he built on them, and the advice he’d give to other dentists just starting out.

Dental School Recollections

Q: Where and when did you go to dental school and why did you choose that specific school?

A: I went to New Jersey Dental School, which is now Rutgers School of Dental Medicine. I chose it because I heard it was better than many of the schools in the tri-state and because I am from Jersey!

Q: What was the greatest overall takeaway you got from the experience?

A: Make great temporaries and take honor in the care you provide.

Q: What useful advice learned in dental school do you still use in the practice today?

A: I started dental school over 20 years ago. So much of what I learned then has evolved into other things in my practice. I will say the one subject that really resonated with me in school was treating patients with TMD. I think that education was very forward thinking and left out of many programs.

Q: What did you learn then that you either never used or don’t use anymore?

A: Gold Foils – I wish I could have done one!  

Q: How have you changed as a dentist since your initial education?

A: I was told then by patients that I was very gentle and easily approachable. I would like to believe I have only built on that. Overall technically-wise, I am a completely different dentist now than I was in dental school. I don’t think dental school excited me very much besides just becoming a dentist. Once I entered my residency and was turned onto excellent CE, cosmetic dentistry, and “cool’ prosthetic procedures, I became a dental nerd and took an excessive amount of CE. 

Q: What advice would you give to dentists early on in their careers who have recently graduated and are looking to achieve success?

A: GET EDUCATED! Decide what type of practice you want to have and get educated on how to get it. Don’t think you have to re-invent the wheel. Emulate someone who practices the way you want and learn how they achieved the level they have!  

What early lessons have stuck with you over the years? We’d love to hear from you in the comments! And check out Dr. Nosti’s post on the ways raising children changes your career and demands compassion.